Sounding out the impacts of urbanization on lakes

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Recording equipment deployed on lake to capture the ‘soundscape’

If you are wondering why you seem stressed out lately, it could be the noise around you. My co-authors (Britta Padgham and Julian Olden) and I just published an article in the journal PLoS One which showed that environmental noise levels at freshwater lakes (the places we like to live, recreate, and relax) can be noisy – quite noisy, in fact – depending on the level of surrounding urbanization. Noise levels at urban lakes surpassed thresholds established by the Environmental Protection Agency for ‘outdoor annoyance and disturbance’ in over two-thirds of hourly measurements (see Figure below); noise levels decreased predictably with lower urbanization in the area surrounding the lake. Interestingly, lakes with public parks were actually noisier than lakes without, which may reflect the influence of the park, but also the fact that parks are placed more often in densely urban areas

But our reporting on urban ‘soundscapes’ isn’t all pain to our ears. A sound check (no pun intended) on the places where people like to spend time and which are often intended as green spaces for wildlife is a first step toward monitoring and managing for the impacts of noise pollution on people and animals. Acoustic oases, anyone? 

You can read more about this study published in the open-access journal PLoS ONE here. This study was also partially funded by a crowdfunding campaign, including a short video, in May of 2012 – I am very grateful to all the people who helped fuel this research on soundscapes where we live and play!

Sound levels over a 24 hour period for lakes which had High, Medium, and Low urbanization in the surrounding area

Sound levels over a 24 hour period for lakes which had High, Medium, and Low urbanization in the surrounding area

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About Lauren Kuehne

Fish, freshwater, invasive critters
This entry was posted in environmental policy, my research, society and the environment and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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